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Memoirs of the Most Noble Richard Marquess Wellesley Robert Rouiere Pearce

Memoirs of the Most Noble Richard Marquess Wellesley

Robert Rouiere Pearce

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER III. Retreat of the British after the Battle of Talavera. MorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.This is an OCR edition with typos.Excerpt from book:CHAPTER III. Retreat of the British after the Battle of Talavera. — Operations of Marshal Soult. — Position of the British at Deleytosa. — The Ambassador Extraordinary opens Correspondence with Sir Arthur Wellesley.—- Observations of Mr. Wilberforce on Marquess Wellesleys Letters.— Remarks of Lord Holland as mentioned by Lord Brougham.—Marquess Wellesley to Sir Arthur.—The General to Marquess Wellesley, complaining of the Neglect and Apathy of the Spanish Government.— British Troops in a State of Starvation. — Sir Arthur Wellesley expostulates with Cuesta.—Declares he will, if not assisted, retire from Spain.—Representations of the British Ambassador and General unheeded.—Resignation of the Spanish Commander-in-Chief.—The Marquess Wellesley addresses Mr. Canning at length, on the Prospects of the Spanish Cause, and the State of the British Army in the Peninsula. On the day following the battle of Talavera Sir Arthur Wellesley was joined by three thousand troops under General Craufurd, who performed a forced march of sixty-two English miles in twenty-six hours. On the 2nd of August, however, as Sir Arthur was preparing to march to Madrid, intelligence reached him that Marshal Soult, with thirty-four thousand men, had penetrated through Puerto de Banos without opposition, the Spanish army having abandoned the place without firing a shot. General Wellesley had by this time learnt the value of the Spanish troops- the artillery was in good order, but both the cavalry and artillery were unfit to perform movements under an enemys fire. On the 3rd of August, therefore, the British army made a retrograde movement and fellback to the southern bank of the Tagus. They remained undisturbed in their position for nearly a month - their head-quarters resting at Deleytosa. Sir Arthur Welle...